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Kraft Your Success by Discovering What You Love

on May 3, 11 • by • with No Comments

It’s weeks like these when I simply love what I do.  I get to help people find their dream work!

Last week my client arrived “not wanting to look for a job” and in the  middle of our work she realized it was because she wanted to start her own business.  Our one hour meeting turned into a 2 hour brainstorming session which I was thrilled to extend because she was on FIRE with energy.  She walked out with a framework for an idea and the beginning of an action plan to begin investigating it. What a shift from where she was 2 hours prior!

Yesterday I was honored by receiving 2 emails from clients who had both landed the kid of job they’d been hoping for. Here’s what one said:  “I landed the perfect job! I’m so happy that I made the investment into my next five year plan. There are some big rewards for being part of this company long term.  I’m really excited to envision my future and know what I’m shooting for and feel great that I have something of great value to contribute.  I can’t thank you enough for coaching me to get here!”  The other landed a job that was right in front of him all along but it took him re-evaluating his strengths, values and what he really wanted to see it from a different perspective.  He was excited to share his great news.

What they both have in common is that they took the time to discover what they really love to do – and what they really want.  In the first example, she took the necessary time  after 25+ years of working in a fast-paced environment to slow down and really explore what was important to her.  In her case it was:  client side work, great benefits, solid team, long term opportunity etc.  In the second case, he realized that his current company values were not aligned with his and his strengths (through Strengthfinder analysis) weren’t valued.  He found a new job with a leader that he knows and trusts and they mutually value each other’s strengths.

Others often start by wanting a full career shift and realize that there are opportunities within their current company or even role that they didn’t see before.  They are relieved that they can find more meaning, fullfilment and happiness without making a huge change.  But in order to see that opportunity, we need to take the time to really define what we want and then take the steps to make it happen.  Change is hard and we have to be motivated internally to get it.  It needs to matter do us at an intrinsic level or it will be hard to commit to the process of make the change.

Often when I pose the question: What do you REALLY want?  I get a blank stare.  It’s not an easy question to answer. But it’s a critical one.  It’s my belief that at the end of the day (or work week) we all just want to make a difference and we hope that someone notices.  And we want to do it our way.   When we do we can motivate others as well.

What is it that you REALLY want (in your career)?

Here’s an exercise that can help.

1) Write down 10 things that come to mind – just write, no judgement.

2) Pick 1-2 that resonate with you and write each one on the top of one sheet of paper.

3) For each item ask yourself “what’s important about getting ______”.  Write that down.  When you have that answer ask yourself “what’s important about (that answer)”.   And then keep on asking “What’s important about (that answer)” until you reach a point that you recognize the intrinsic  motivation of what it is that you really want.  That’s the motivation that will help you get there!

Cheers to discovering work you love and making it happen!

(Incidentally, 100% of my committed clients find a new role within 4-6 months of our work together.  I’d love to make that happen for you if you’re someone looking for what’s next.)

 

 

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